Diabetic Retinopathy animation

Diabetic retinopathy is a leading cause of vision loss and can lead to blindness.



Diabetic retinopathy educational video animation

Diabetes is a chronic disease that affects more than 420 million people worldwide. If left uncontrolled, diabetes can lead to serious damage to many of the body’s systems, including the eyes. These diabetic eye complications can include cataracts, glaucoma and diabetic retinopathy.



Usually affecting both eyes, it occurs when diabetes damages the tiny blood vessels on the retina, the light-sensitive tissue located on the back inner-wall of the eye.

Eye doctors commonly separate Diabetic Retinopathy into 2 stages: Non-proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy (NPDR) and Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy (PDR).

In NPDR, the earliest stage of diabetic retinopathy, microaneurysms occur. They are small areas of balloon-like swelling in the tiny blood vessels that nourish the retina. As they increase in number, they tend to cluster and leak fluid into the complex retinal layers.

As the disease progresses, the retinal blood vessels may become irregularly shaped, dilated and leaky. Small hemorrhages may occur and discrete whitish-yellow fat residue can accumulate as a result of the leakage.

The damaged blood vessels can also lose their ability to transport blood, depriving areas of the retina of their nourishing blood and oxygen supply.

Sometimes, the macula, the part of the retina that provides sharp, central vision, begins to swell, causing diabetic macular edema, or DME — a vision-blurring condition. DME is the most common cause of vision loss in patients with diabetic retinopathy and it requires treatment.

Common treatments for these early-to-mid-stage diabetic complications include:  eye drops, laser photocoagulation and painless injections of medications into the eye.

As more and more blood vessels are damaged and blocked, the retina becomes stressed and sends out signals for oxygen and nourishment, triggering the growth of new blood vessels. This is called neovascularization, the hallmark of the advanced stage – Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy.

These new blood vessels are weak and fragile and have thin, delicate walls. They will often bleed into the vitreous — the transparent gel-like tissue filling the inside of the eyeball.

Blood in the vitreous causes symptoms ranging from barely noticeable, to complete vision loss in the affected eye. Common symptoms of a vitreous hemorrhage include:  small, dark floating spots in the vision; a reddish tint; or random-shaped darkened sections of the vision.

Common treatments for PDR include: heavy laser photocoagulation and intravitreal medication injections.

In the severe, uncontrolled stage of PDR, scar tissue, as a result of neovascularization and bleeding, can contract, causing the retina to pull away from underlying tissue – this is called Retinal Detachment and can lead to permanent vision loss. This type of retinal detachment must be repaired surgically.

Diabetic retinopathy can’t always be controlled. However, good blood sugar and blood pressure control, regular eye exams and early intervention for vision problems will decrease the risk of severe vision loss.

Lucentis Eye Injection

Lucentis eye injection is a treatment for macular degeneration




Lucentis eye injection treatment for macular degeneration and vein occlusion

Wet macular degeneration is one of the most common causes of blindness, Lucentis eye injection is a treatment.

Lucentis eye injection is a modern treatment for wet AMD, which develops in about 1 in 10 cases of macular degeneration. Above is a video explaining how Lucentis eye injection is used to treat wet macular degeneration. There are two types of macular degeneration: dry and wet macular degeneration. In the wet form of AMD, abnormal blood vessels grow in the back of the eye. Sometimes these vessels leak blood or fluid that causes blurred vision or distorted vision. Without treatment, vision loss may be quick and severe.

The patient should consult their retina specialist / ophthalmologist about signs and symptoms of Lucentis side effects. Lucentis is an eye injection drug given by an eye surgeon. It is better and more effective than traditional laser eye surgery because it does not leave scarring in the macular central portion of vision. Lucentis was developed by Genentech and it is widely used for wet macular degeneration.



Lucentis side effects

Lucentis eye injection for treatment of macular degeneration has very few and rare side effects. The possibility of infection is extremely important to understand and the patient should consult their retina specialist / ophthalmologist about signs and symptoms of Lucentis side effects.

Other uses for Lucentis eye injection

Recently, Lucentis was approved for retinal vein occlusion and diabetic macular edema. These are two eye conditions that can cause profound vision loss. Adding Lucentis eye injection to the vitreo-retina doctor’s arsenal is a big advancement in the retina eye care field.

Diabetic macular edema is one of the leading causes of vision loss in the world. It is caused by weakened and leaky capillaries in the retinal vascular system, due to diabetes.

Retinal vein occlusion can also cause macular edema. This condition, also known as cystoid macular edema, as responded well to Lucentis eye injection. Lucentis is now a mainstream treatment for these two eye conditions.